Parents file lawsuit in movie-theater death of 26-year-old man with Down syndrome

By Theresa Vargas, Published: October 17

The parents of Robert Ethan Saylor, a 26-year-old with Down syndrome who lost consciousness as three off-duty Frederick County sheriff’s deputies forced him from a movie theater, filed a lawsuit Thursday that describes his death as “violent, terrifying and painful” and blames it on the negligence and deliberate actions of others.

The lawsuit, filed in the U.S. District Court of Maryland, names the deputies, the movie theater, the shopping center’s property manager, the sheriff’s office and the county as responsible for Saylor’s death on Jan. 12 and seeks unspecified punitive and compensatory damages. Continue reading Parents file lawsuit in movie-theater death of 26-year-old man with Down syndrome

Disabled NJ Girl Denied Transplant Gets Mother’s Kidney

Disabled NJ Girl Denied Transplant Gets Mother’s Kidney
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Performed Surgery on Amelia Rivera

By SUSAN DONALDSON JAMES
ABC News
Oct. 11, 2013—

The New Jersey girl who was initially denied a transplant because of her mental disabilities has received a kidney and is at home with her two older brothers on the way to recovery.

Amelia Rivera, now 5, received a kidney from her mother, Chrissy Rivera, on July 3 at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Her case inspired the state to pass legislation that prohibits discrimination against transplant patients.

“Things are going really well for Amelia and we were very pleased with the care we received from CHOP,” Rivera told ABCNews.com.

Rivera and her husband Joe said the care at CHOP was excellent and they have no hard feelings toward the hospital. But they said they hope others don’t have to go through their ordeal. Continue reading Disabled NJ Girl Denied Transplant Gets Mother’s Kidney

Letter to the Editor – “Why did Robert Saylor Die?”

Nothing that any of us can say or write can bring back Robert Ethan Saylor, or ease the pain of his family, or diminish the loss his friends are feeling. So many lessons can be learned from James Mulvaney’s March 10 Local Opinions article “Why did Robert Saylor Die?” One hopes, in particular, that Mr. Mulvaney’s phrase “to recognize that a disability is not a crime” will come across loud and clear in Frederick, Washington and beyond.

Washington Post
March 12, 2013

Letters to the Editor – Robert Ethan Saylor

Even though we all too often read of the senseless killings of people in the wrong place at the wrong time, Robert Ethan Saylor had not been in the wrong place. He simply did not have a ticket to watch a movie in a theater a second time. He also had Down syndrome which perhaps frightened the security guards who removed him so forcefully from the theater that he died.

This story in the Opinion Pages of the New York Times today, about the tragic death of Robert Ethan Saylor, should be a wake-up call for society.

Nothing any of us can say or write can bring back Robert Ethan Saylor, ease the pain of his family, or diminish the loss his friends are feeling. But a friend of mine with Down syndrome said something for us all to heed: that if we see people with disabilities like his and Mr. Saylor’s we should keep our eyes and ears open and then give them the respect they deserve.

It is incumbent upon us all to learn about people with intellectual or physical challenges, with different abilities, and perhaps with different facial structures, and that includes sensitivity training for those who work among the general population, such as police and private security guards.

It seems like such an easy task, but it might have saved Mr. Saylor’s life.

sent to the NY Times
March 19, 2013

Mary Ann Carmody
RN, BSN, AASECT-Certified Sexuality Educator